Latest in Hack Attack

The Grandmaster Activist

  ‘Another twenty years of Ilyumzhinov’ – Mikhail Golubev talks to Sarah Hurst   Mikhail Golubev became a grandmaster in 1996, the year he won the Ukrainian Championship.  He has won or shared first prize in 17 international tournaments and has assisted former world champions Anatoly…

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Missed Brilliancy

 Sznapik – Bhend Bath 1973 White to play The game continued 19 Bh4 g5 20 Bxg5 fxg5 21 Rh3 and White won in a few moves. Can you do better?

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Kamikaze King and Queen

 Segel – Fox Antwerp, 1900 Black to play        23…Qxg3+! 24 Kxg3 Rg8+ 25 Kh4 Ng6+ 26 Kh5 Nf4+      27 Kxh6 Ne6+ 28 Kh5     28…Rh8 mate The winner of this game, Albert Whiting Fox (1881-1964), is one of the forgotten masters…

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Humdinger of a Move

  Jean-René Koch – Neil Carr French U21 Ch, Montpellier, 1987  (Notes by Neil Carr)      1 e4 g6 2 d4 Bg7 3 Nf3 d6 Readers of the last Kingpin will remember (to their cost!) that I was feeling like a right Pirc during the…

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Frog in the Throat

The late Neil Carr recounted this anecdote in Kingpin 12 (Autumn 1987).    The French International U-21 Championship held in Montpellier in April was a well-run 9 round tournament which produced some fine attacking chess. It was won by L. Stratil of Czechoslovakia (Strepsil to…

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Great Swindles Of Our Time

  Neil Carr wrote some funny articles for Kingpin. His dynamic style of play, breezy sense of humour and fondness for excruciating wordplay made him an ideal contributor. This turbulent game appeared in Kingpin 11. The dubious honour of having contributed more to this section of Kingpin…

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Confessions of a Crooked Chess Master – Part 2

Michael Basman   International Intrigue   It was Hastings 1967-8 at the annual congress run by Frank Rhoden. I had not been doing particularly well after having bullied Frank into giving me a place in the tournament. ‘I’ve got to invite Keene, Hartston and Penrose,…

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Confessions of a Crooked Chess Master – Part 1

Michael Basman   The Slippery Slope   My first step along the road to perdition came in the London Under-14 Boys Championship in 1959 (in those days girls didn’t or couldn’t play chess). It was round 5 and I was playing J.N. Eyres of Colfe’s…

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Zukertort Zigzagged

 Zukertort – Potter London, 1876 Black to play   Black has been gradually outplayed and is hanging on by his fingertips. He’s a pawn down, his queen is attacked, and the threat of a4-a5 seems terminal. After 36…Qe4 37 Qxe4 fxe4 38 a4 the pawn will…

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Fiendish Moves #2

 Kupper – Leepin Basel, 1954 White to play   Black has nothing to fear from 27 Qd8+ Kh7 28 Nf8+ Kh6 29 Qd4 Re2 when the position is equal.      27 Nf8! A brilliant move, and the only decisive one.      27…Bh7 27…Qxe5 fails…

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