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Pub Chat with Jimmy Adams part 1

‘I love Bobby Fischer!’ Recorded interview with Sarah Hurst. Jimmy Adams began his chess career at the age of 11, when he joined a local chess club in Islington, North London. He soon became a London Junior Champion but then played relatively little chess throughout…

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All the Potentialities of Vice

CHESS AND CHARACTER. To the Editor of The Daily Mail. Sir,—There appears to be a recrudescence of interest in the perennial game of chess. Most of us can play, indifferently or well; most of us play for amusement. But I wonder whether it is generally…

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The Sultan of Swash: Part 1

Chess writer Jimmy Adams ranks him among the ‘strongest ever amateur chess players’ (New in Chess 2013/3). A master of the dashing attack, he defeated several of the world’s leading players, often in brilliant style. Born in Dnipropetrovs’k (then Ekaterinoslav), he left the Ukraine in his…

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The Birmingham Blues

Stuart Conquest   By my watch it is now some seven months since Tony Miles died. I was playing with the England team in Leon when the news came through. I remember coming down to breakfast that morning, picking out the usual assorted items from…

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A Saint-Amant Game

Olimpiu G. Urcan    Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant (1800-1872) [From a feature in the Illustrated London News, 28 December 1844, page 416; also published in Edward Winter’s C.N. 7610] A complete and competent biography of Pierre Charles Fournier de Saint-Amant (1800–1872) would be something to truly…

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Play Chess and Live Longer

Adrian Harvey reviews   The average life expectancy for males in the nineteenth century was forty-six.1 What is striking about this selection of major figures in Victorian chess is the very long lives they enjoyed. With the exception of Zukertort, whose lifespan was average for…

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Beards

How well I remember Steinitz!–short, squat, and stout, with thick red hair and beard, rejoicing in a nose unusually small for one of the Semitic race. He smoked and sipped claret and water, or gin and water–scrupulously iced notwithstanding the coldness of the weather–all the…

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A Bad End to the Year

Olimpiu G. Urcan offers the following tragic-comic true story from the Cleveland Plain Dealer of December 30, 1910 (page 11). It’s not clear who won the game but we hope it was Carman.   G.B. Carman and his brother-in-law, Arthur Gradolph, living at 1343 E. 112th-st.,…

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